Employees denied remote working options

5851726647_9e0f8c05b0_oWhile employees are getting more control over their hours, most still do not have flexibility over where they work.

That’s according to The Workforce View 2013, a survey of 2,500 employees by human capital specialist ADP.

It said almost two thirds (73%) of employees work in one fixed location. Only 17% work in multiple locations, 13% work from home, and just 7% get to divide their time between work and home. Sales, media, marketing and the arts & culture sectors are the most open to mobile working as fewer than half of employees work in a fixed location.

The research confirmed that employees welcome the ability to work flexibly: half of those questioned already enjoy total (26%) or a degree (24%) of flexibility, while 37% would like to have total flexibility over their working hours. More than 50% of employees at director level want this level of flexibility. As a rule, older workers are more in favour of totally flexible hours than younger workers.

Hazel Privett, human resources director for ADP UK, said the data also showed employees are ready to roll up their sleeves to help organisations perform during economic recovery. “Employers who respond to this adaptability – by enabling their employees to work more flexibly and equipping them with the right tools to do so – will be seen as dynamic and better positioned to survive and thrive in an improving, but still challenging economy.”

Image credit: http://www.flickr.com/photos/60119707@N08/

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Categories: Mobile working, News

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